Month: February 2014

Exercise Pain In Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/fibromyalgia Vs. Rheumatoid Arthritis

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Exercise may slow diseases that cause blindness

The intent of this study was to compare two chronic pain populations to see how they differ. Researchers had a group of women with ME/CFS/FMS, a group of women with rheumatoid arthritis (RA,) and a group of healthy women exercise on a bicycle and looked at several measures of pain before and after the sessions. Half of them received a placebo while the others were given the pain drug paracetamol . Exertion levels were below maximums and exercise sessions were a full week apart. Their analysis showed: The RA group had reductions in pain after exercise, both with the drug and with the placebo; In the ME/CFS/FMS placebo group, some measures showed worsening pain while other measures were in conclusive but seemed to indicate worsening; In the ME/CFS/FMS paracetamol group, some people had a decrease in pain measurements, but the decrease was p90X3 review not significant.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://chronicfatigue.about.com/b/2014/02/19/exercise-pain-in-chronic-fatigue-syndromefibromyalgia-vs-rheumatoid-arthritis.htm?r=94

“However,” they write, “exercised mice exposed to bright light had 2 times greater http://www.sbwire.com/press-releases/p90x3-reviews/sbwire-455028.htm retinal function and photoreceptor nuclei than inactive mice exposed to bright light.” Plus, they found the exercised mice had 20% higher levels of BDNF protein than the non-exercised mice. Exercise protects the retina, probably by raising levels of BDNF To test whether it was BDNF that was mediating the effect of exercise, the researchers injected the mice with a drug that blocked the protein. They found it reduced retinal function and photoreceptor counts in the exercised mice to “inactive levels.” The researchers conclude their findings “suggest that aerobic exercise is neuroprotective for retinal degeneration and that this effect is mediated by BDNF signaling.” Dr. Pardue says: “This is the first report of simple exercise having a direct effect on retinal health and vision. This research may one day lead to tailored exercise regimens or combination therapies in treatments of blinding diseases.” Dr.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/272840.php

Aging well exercise, mental stimulation, social activity

It makes you depressed. “It isn’t just about being with others. The frequency of contact is unimportant,” Cacioppo said. “It’s what that person means to you that really matters.” On the topic of social media, Cacioppo asked whether it’s a way to make friends or a substitute for connection. “If you have no contact, then it’s better than nothing,” he said.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.sfgate.com/health/article/Aging-well-exercise-mental-stimulation-social-5246368.php

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